PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Social distancing rules have changed how my vet operates. How do I know when I should call them?

ANSWER

If your pet is sick, injured, seems to be in pain, or may have taken in something poisonous, you should call your vet for urgent care.

Call your vet right away if your pet has bleeding that’s severe or doesn’t stop within a few minutes, they’re bleeding from the nose, rectum, or mouth, or they cough up or pee blood.

You should also call if they have vomiting or diarrhea that happens more than twice in 24 hours, they’re unable to poop or pee, or seem to be in pain when they do.

Other emergencies that need attention right away include eye injuries, choking, nonstop cough or gagging, shortness of breath, fractures, seizures or staggering, heat-related stress, refusal to drink water for 24 hours or longer, or passing out.

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on September 23, 2020

Medically Reviewed on 9/23/2020

SOURCES:

American Animal Hospital Association: “Pandemic realities: Could animal hospitals be forced to close?”

American Veterinary Medical Association: “COVID-19: What Veterinarians Need to Know,” “Pet Dental Care,” “13 Animal emergencies that require immediate veterinary consultation and/or care.”

North Shore Animal League of America: “Caring for Your Pets During the Coronavirus Crisis,” “Pet First-Aid Kit Essentials.”

University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine: “COVID-19: Recommendations for Veterinary Practices.”

UC Davis Veterinary Medicine: “FAQs for Pet Owners During the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

Animal Medical Center of New York: “COVID-19 and Pets.”

FDA: “Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Helps Facilitate Veterinary Telemedicine During Pandemic.”

People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals: “Exercise for Indoor Cats.”

American Kennel Club: “How Many Treats Can Your Dog Really Have?”

Cornell Feline Health Center: “Obesity.”

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on September 23, 2020

SOURCES:

American Animal Hospital Association: “Pandemic realities: Could animal hospitals be forced to close?”

American Veterinary Medical Association: “COVID-19: What Veterinarians Need to Know,” “Pet Dental Care,” “13 Animal emergencies that require immediate veterinary consultation and/or care.”

North Shore Animal League of America: “Caring for Your Pets During the Coronavirus Crisis,” “Pet First-Aid Kit Essentials.”

University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine: “COVID-19: Recommendations for Veterinary Practices.”

UC Davis Veterinary Medicine: “FAQs for Pet Owners During the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

Animal Medical Center of New York: “COVID-19 and Pets.”

FDA: “Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Helps Facilitate Veterinary Telemedicine During Pandemic.”

People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals: “Exercise for Indoor Cats.”

American Kennel Club: “How Many Treats Can Your Dog Really Have?”

Cornell Feline Health Center: “Obesity.”

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on September 23, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

How can I ease my pet’s anxiety when I feel stressed or anxious myself?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.