After One Pet Dies: Should You Get a New One?

While you may be tempted to replace the pet you lost, it's best to take some time to think and grieve, one expert says.

From the WebMD Archives

Losing a much-loved pet is never easy. But even harder for many is being without a four-footed companion. Veterinarian Sheri Morris, DABVP, of Willamette Valley Animal Hospital in Keizer, Ore., offers a few thoughts about welcoming a new furry friend into your life.

Woe begone. Finish your grieving first. You can't simply replace a lost pet. You have to be ready for a new personality. "People need time to miss their pets and to think about them," says Morris. When you find yourself wanting a companion on your walks or a wagging tail to greet you when you arrive home, you'll know it's time.

Animal house. Consider the needs of your other household pets. They'll need time to adjust. Make sure you're constantly around to separate them if problems arise. "The most important thing is to supervise," Morris says. "You never know if they will accept the new pet quickly." Dogs adapt faster than cats: one to two weeks versus a month to six weeks.

Prepare yourself. When she lost one of her dogs, Morris she waited a year before she felt ready for a puppy. Again, it's best to be over the grieving stage before taking on a new member of the family, she says.

WebMD Magazine - Feature Reviewed by D. West Hamryka, DVM on October 5, 2011

Sources

SOURCE:

Sheri Morris, DABVP, Willamette Valley Animal Hospital, Keizer, Ore.

© 2011 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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