Reviewed by Amy Flowers on September 12, 2012

Sources

Kate Jackson, Certified Dog Trainer.

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Video Transcript

Kate Jackson: STAY! Dogs are way more visual than they are verbal, so the hand signal is the key to getting a reliable stay. Once you've got your little dog sitting, you'll ask them to stay with a hand signal. Whenever you give them a treat, make sure you bend down—yes—to give them the treat. You don't ever want to lean over your little dog. This can be very threatening. If your dog gets up before you've released them, use your "no reward marker"-- Uh, uh! And ask them to sit again. Over time, you're then going to increase the distance and amount of time you ask your little dog to stay … Really important thing about stay. Is that you always come back to your little dog to let them up. You don't ever want to teach your little dog that they can jump up and run over to you. That could be a safety issue. So with enough practice you'll be able to do distance stays with your dog, out of sight stays, and stays with major distractions, For WebMD's Pint Size One Minute Trainer, I'm Kate Jackson.