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What is the treatment for pancreatitis in dogs?

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For the first 24 hours, vets may recommend no food or water, and pain medications by mouth. That gives the pancreas a rest. Giving your dog IV fluids is a common practice for pancreatitis. When your dog gets home, give it lots of water so it doesn't get dehydrated. Your dog may need medication for pain, and maybe also to ease nausea and vomiting. When your dog starts eating again, make it low in fat and easy to digest. Ask your vet, but it's probably a good idea to stick with this diet for several months, and possibly for life.

SOURCES:

American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation: "Pancreatitis."

News release, Colorado State University.

MedlinePlus: "Abscess," "Pancreatic Diseases."

The Merck Manual Veterinary Edition: "Pancreatitis in Small Animals."

The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine: "Holiday Safety Tips for Pet Owners."

Jan Suchodolski, med.vet., Dr. med.vet, PhD, Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Texas A&M Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences: "Pancreatitis Information" and "Pancreatic Lipase Immunoreactivity (PLI)."

Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine: Your Dog: "Big Steak Dinner."

Craig B. Webb, PhD, DVM, Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on July 21, 2019

SOURCES:

American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation: "Pancreatitis."

News release, Colorado State University.

MedlinePlus: "Abscess," "Pancreatic Diseases."

The Merck Manual Veterinary Edition: "Pancreatitis in Small Animals."

The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine: "Holiday Safety Tips for Pet Owners."

Jan Suchodolski, med.vet., Dr. med.vet, PhD, Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Texas A&M Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences: "Pancreatitis Information" and "Pancreatic Lipase Immunoreactivity (PLI)."

Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine: Your Dog: "Big Steak Dinner."

Craig B. Webb, PhD, DVM, Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on July 21, 2019

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