PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are the types of seizures in dogs?

ANSWER

The most common kind is the generalized seizure, also called a grand mal seizure. A dog can lose consciousness and convulse. The abnormal electrical activity happens throughout the brain. Generalized seizures usually last from a few seconds to a few minutes. With a focal seizure, abnormal electrical activity happens in only part of the brain. Focal seizures can cause unusual movements in one limb or one side of the body. Sometimes they last only a couple of seconds. They may start as focal and then become generalized. A psychomotor seizure involves strange behavior that only lasts a couple of minutes. Your dog may suddenly start attacking an imaginary object or chasing its tail. It can be tricky to tell psychomotor seizures from odd behavior, but a dog that has them will always do the same thing every time it has a seizure. Seizures from unknown causes are called idiopathic epilepsy. They usually happen in dogs between 6 months and 6 years old. Although any dog can have a seizure, idiopathic epilepsy is more common in border collies, Australian shepherds, Labrador retrievers, beagles, Belgian Tervurens, collies, and German shepherds.

SOURCES:

American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation: “How to Handle a Seizure in Dogs.” 

American Veterinary Medical Association: “Pet First Aid - Basic Procedures."

Epilepsy Foundation of Delaware: “About Seizures.”

Stephen M. Hanson, D.V.M., M.S., D.I.P., ACVIM (neurology), veterinary neurologist, Veterinary Neurology Center in Irvine, Calif.

Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine: “Neurology Service: Information for Owners: Seizures.” 

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on July 23, 2017

SOURCES:

American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation: “How to Handle a Seizure in Dogs.” 

American Veterinary Medical Association: “Pet First Aid - Basic Procedures."

Epilepsy Foundation of Delaware: “About Seizures.”

Stephen M. Hanson, D.V.M., M.S., D.I.P., ACVIM (neurology), veterinary neurologist, Veterinary Neurology Center in Irvine, Calif.

Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine: “Neurology Service: Information for Owners: Seizures.” 

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on July 23, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What should I do if my dog has a seizure?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.