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How can dogs get Cushing’s syndrome?

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Cushing's syndrome happens when your dog’s body makes too much of a hormone called cortisol. This chemical helps your dog respond to stress, control weight, fight infections, and keep its blood sugar levels in check. But too much or too little of it can cause problems. Cushing’s, which is also known as hypercortisolism and hyperadrenocorticism, can be tricky for a vet to diagnose, because it has the same symptoms as other conditions. The key is to let your vet know about anything that’s different about your pet.

From: Cushing’s Syndrome in Dogs WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College Veterinary Internal Medicine. "ACVIM Fact Sheet: Cushing's Syndrome in Dogs."

The Merck Veterinary Manual. "Hyperadrenocorticism."

VCA Animal Hospitals.

University of Rochester Medical College.

FDA.

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on October 6, 2019

SOURCES:

American College Veterinary Internal Medicine. "ACVIM Fact Sheet: Cushing's Syndrome in Dogs."

The Merck Veterinary Manual. "Hyperadrenocorticism."

VCA Animal Hospitals.

University of Rochester Medical College.

FDA.

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on October 6, 2019

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Is there a cure for Cushing’s syndrome in dogs?

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