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How can I prepare for my cat's pregnancy?

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Make your home a comfortable place for the impending birth. If you normally let your cat go outside, stop that, in case she goes into labor during one of her walkabouts. About two weeks before the due date, you may notice your cat is acting differently as she gets into nesting mode. To help out, you can scan your home for a good birthing spot for her. Find a medium-sized box with a low opening, and cover it with newspapers, old towels, and soft blankets to create a relaxing area for the mother and her future kittens. You should place the nesting box in a quiet corner of your house. Let your pregnant cat visit it often, before the birth, so she gets used to the area and feels comfortable. Keep in mind that you can guide your cat as much as possible and set up the ultimate birthing spot, but she's going to do what she's going to do. If she wants to give birth in a laundry basket, behind the garbage can, or in the back of your closet, she will. When you notice that she’s in nesting mode, take her to the vet for her final prenatal visit. Your vet can give you more information about how to prepare for the delivery, check on the mother and kitties’ health, and tell you want to do if there’s an emergency during the birth. Two clues that the big day is coming: Cats usually stop eating 24 hours before they give birth, and their temperature drops below 100 F.

SOURCES:

Cats Protection, "Pregnant Cats, Birth and Care of Young Kittens: Essential Guide 18."

Richards, J. "ASPCA Complete Guide to Cats: Everything You Need to Know About Choosing and Caring for Your Cat," Chronicle Books, 1999.

Princeton Veterinary Hospital.

SpayFirst.

Eldredge, D., Carlson, D., Carlson, L., Giffin, J. "Cat Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook," Turner Publishing Company, 2007.

Shaina Preis, DVM, veterinarian, Banfield Pet Hospital.

Merck Manual: "Breeding and Reproduction of Cats." 

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on May 20, 2019

SOURCES:

Cats Protection, "Pregnant Cats, Birth and Care of Young Kittens: Essential Guide 18."

Richards, J. "ASPCA Complete Guide to Cats: Everything You Need to Know About Choosing and Caring for Your Cat," Chronicle Books, 1999.

Princeton Veterinary Hospital.

SpayFirst.

Eldredge, D., Carlson, D., Carlson, L., Giffin, J. "Cat Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook," Turner Publishing Company, 2007.

Shaina Preis, DVM, veterinarian, Banfield Pet Hospital.

Merck Manual: "Breeding and Reproduction of Cats." 

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on May 20, 2019

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