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    Yeast Infection in Dogs: Causes, Treatment, and Prevention

    If your pooch is rubbing his ear or tilting his head, he may have an ear infection caused by an overgrowth of yeast.

    Fortunately, a yeast infection of the outer ear is easy to spot. In addition to rubbing, the signs include a waxy residue and scabbing around the opening of the ear. The condition is usually simple to treat.

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    Unfortunately, an ear infection in your dog caused by yeast is sometimes associated with an underlying condition, such as

    • Allergies
    • Bacterial infection
    • A ruptured eardrum
    • Tumor or polyp within the ear canal
    • A trapped object

    Once your vet has determined that Fido is suffering from an ear infection caused by yeast, she might conduct tests to check for other health problems. First, though, it’s important to treat the yeast infection. A yeast infection can be painful and can lead to deafness.

    What Causes Yeast Infection of the Ear?

    A dog’s ear canal plunges downward and then away from the ear opening (it is shaped like a “L”). That gives yeast a favorable environment in which to grow. If your dog swims or is bathed frequently, trapped water or debris in the ear canal can lead to yeast infections. Allergens like pollens, mold, dust, feathers, cigarette smoke, cleaning products, and certain foods can also lead to ear infections in a dog.

    A dog's outer ear extends from the outside of the earlobe to the ear drum. An infection in this part of the ear is called otitis externa. An infection in the middle ear -- otitis media - typically develops in association with an outer ear infection. Then once the middle ear is infected, the infection can spread to the inner ear, where it will affect the dog's sense of balance and position. An inner ear infection can also cause deafness. Catching and treating an infection early, while it's still in the outer ear, will help prevent more serious middle and inner ear infections.

    Yeast infections can also show up elsewhere on your dog’s skin. When one does, it causes the skin to become scabby, reddened, or crusty.

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