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    Pets Battling Cancer Can Join Clinical Trials, Too

    Vets, physicians say a new system may speed up drug discovery for dogs, cats and humans

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Barbara Bronson Gray

    HealthDay Reporter

    THURSDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- If you hear that a friend's beloved family member has joined a clinical trial for cancer treatment, don't assume the patient is human.

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in older dogs and cats, and clinical trials offer hope that effective medications will be developed -- for humans and their four-legged friends, cancer experts say.

    The new National Veterinary Cancer Registry, launched last month by a national team of animal and human cancer doctors, will point pet owners toward clinical trials that might benefit their beloved companions and speed up the development of life-saving therapies for humans.

    "We will be able to decrease the cost and beat the time involved in drug discovery," said the registry's founder, Dr. Theresa Fossum, a professor of surgery at Texas A&M University's college of veterinary medicine.

    Because many similar diseases affect people and their animals, veterinarians and physicians say a lot can be learned from studying how treatments work in cats and dogs.

    The drug-assessment process could be accelerated by a simple fact: dogs age many times faster than humans, and their cancers progress more rapidly too. Also, many canine and feline cancers -- including sarcoma; non-Hodgkin lymphoma; leukemia; mesothelioma; and bone, ovarian, kidney, uterine and oral cancers -- are virtually the same cancers humans have.

    Experts not involved with the registry said the concept of the database looks promising.

    "These clinical trials would be more real-world than a lab experiment," said Dr. Peter Rabinowitz, associate professor of medicine at Yale School of Medicine and head of the Yale Human Animal Medicine Project, which studies clinical connections between human and animal medicine.

    Dogs often are an interesting model for better understanding environmentally induced cancers, Rabinowitz said. "Asbestos causes cancer in humans 35 years [after exposure], but if you're a dog, you get it in four to five years, so we can see how the cancers develop more naturally," he said.

    Fossum said she has always been bothered by the slow and cumbersome way drugs are tested. "If it's a cancer drug, they're going to put a human tumor in a mouse ... but it's not very predictive of how drugs will work in people," she said.

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