Skip to content

    Healthy Pets

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Dog Nose Discharge: Common Causes and Treatments

    A runny nose can be a big deal for a dog, who has 220 million smell receptors compared to your 5 million. And while nose discharge can be a sign of something as simple as your dog's excitement that you're home, it can also be a symptom of a problem as serious as cancer.

    Get the quick facts about the causes of nose discharge in dogs.

    Recommended Related to Pets

    Kidney Disease in Cats

    Cats with kidney problems have a reduced ability to excrete waste products into their urine, leading to a potentially toxic build-up in the bloodstream. While some kidney problems occur suddenly, chronic kidney disease shows up more slowly over a period of time. Timely veterinary assessment with ongoing supportive care and dietary management can allow some cats with kidney problems to maintain an adequate quality of life.

    Read the Kidney Disease in Cats article > >

    Common Causes and Treatments of Nose Discharge in Dogs

    Generally, you don't have to worry about clear nose discharge in dogs unless it lingers or there are other symptoms. However, discharge that's cloudy, yellow, green, or smelly is always cause for concern. When in doubt, talk to your vet.

    Here are some common causes of nose discharge in dogs:

    Allergies.If there's a clear nasal discharge from your dog's nose, chances are good it's caused by allergies, by far the most common reason for abnormal nasal secretions in dogs.

    Just like people, dogs can be allergic to pollens, foods, drugs, mites, spores, and chemicals. They can even be allergic to human dander (our shed skin). A dog's allergy symptoms don't stop at a runny nose; they can also include sneezing, coughing, itchiness, nosebleeds, and breathing problems.

    Avoiding the allergy trigger is the best way to treat allergies, but that can be hard to do, especially if you don't know what's behind your dog's symptoms. Talk to your vet, who may suggest an allergy test and/or treatment with antihistamine drugs.

    A blockage . A discharge from just one of your dog's nostrils is often a sign there's something stuck in that nostril, like a seed or blade of grass. Other signs include sneezing, pawing at the nose, and nosebleeds.

    If you can easily see what's in your dog's nose, carefully remove it with tweezers. If you can't or don't feel comfortable -- the nose can bleed a lot with minor trauma -- call your vet, who may need to sedate your pet to dislodge the blockage, and then prescribe antibiotics to avoid infection.

    Infection . A nose discharge of mucus or pus could indicate your dog has a bacterial, fungal, or viral infection. Additional signs of an infection might include a bad odor, a nosebleed, and coughing or choking resulting from postnasal drip.

    1 | 2 | 3

    Today on WebMD

    Puppy digging hole
    Are you putting your pet at risk?
    Cat looking at fish
    Things we can learn from our pets.
     
    dog and kitten
    27 ways pets help your health.
    tick
    Get the facts about prevention.
     
    Woman holding puppy
    Article
    Sad dog and guacamole
    Slideshow
     
    Siamese cat eating from bowl
    Slideshow
    cat on couch
    Evaluator
     
    Cat People vs Dog People Slideshow
    Slideshow
    Kitten playing
    Quiz
     
    Orange cat nuzzling woman
    Slideshow
    German shephard reading a book
    Quiz