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Taking your pet to the vet? Whether it's a routine appointment or you're checking on symptoms, there are steps you can take to help the appointment go well.

Bringing your pet’s health records, or having them transferred ahead of time, is one of the most important things to do.

Over the years, your pet may see more than one vet, and possibly also go to emergency or specialty hospitals. Records from these visits have information about your pet’s drug allergies, sensitivity to anesthesia, and baseline blood values. Some veterinarians make these records readily available. Others require signed releases.

"Ultimately, having access to complete medical records is essential to quality of care," says Gene Bailey, who owns The Animal Hospital of Peak Plaza in Apex, N.C.

Also, if it's your pet's first visit, ask the staff:

  • How to contact the staff if your pet has an emergency
  • Whether they offer after-hour emergency appointments
  • If they can give you contact information for local emergency clinics and poison control
  • How you should contact them (phone, text, or email) with questions that aren't urgent

Note Foods, Medications, and More

For routine visits, bring a list of your pet's food brands and medications, details of any special diets and treats, and how much food your pet gets each day.

Be specific. "'A handful' doesn’t mean anything to me," says Ken Werner, DVM, who owns Werner Animal Hospital in Morris Plains, N.J. His advice: Use a measuring cup so you know exactly how much food you're giving your pet.

Tell your vet, too, about any change in your pet's water drinking habits, appetite, playfulness, energy level, or other behaviors and any vomiting or diarrhea. 

Discuss Any Symptoms

Think your pet may have a serious illness? Try to remain calm and objective. Be prepared to give your vet details of the symptoms and how long they've been going on.

Note changes in your pet's thirst, bowel habits, or urination. 

"If people don’t give me a history, I'm very handicapped because I can talk to these dogs and cats all day and they’re not going to answer me," Werner says.