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Is It Time to Put My Pet to Sleep?

By Suz Redfearn
WebMD Pet Health Feature
Reviewed by Amy Flowers, DVM

It’s one of the hardest calls animal lovers have to make: Is it time to put your pet down?

There’s no right or wrong answer. It’s a personal matter for each pet owner. The goal is to keep your friend with you for as long as he’s comfortable, but let him go if he’s in pain.

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Talk to an Expert

The first step is to talk to your vet about your pet’s outlook and pain levels. The vet may not tell you whether he thinks it’s time, but he can give you a clear picture of the animal’s health.

If your pet is sick and you know he won’t get better, focus on how to relieve his pain (or confusion in the case of dementia).

“The suffering of the pet is paramount and should be the first concern,” says Karl E. Jandrey, DVM, a veterinarian at the University of California, Davis.

What to Look For

When you’re home with your pet and the vet isn’t there, how can you tell whether he’s worse this week than last?         

Andrew D. Nguyen, DVM, veterinarian at Columbia Pike Animal Hospital in Annandale, VA, says to think about all of this while your pet’s still healthy.
 

He suggests making a list of your pet’s five favorite things. Running to the door to greet you when you get home? Fetching? Treats? Catnip? Toys?

Next, tune in to how your pet interacts with his environment. Know that one day he won’t be able to enjoy his favorite things.

Plan Ahead

The key, Nguyen says, is to create guidelines ahead of time. That way, when your pet’s health declines and you’re upset, you can check the plan you made when you were more clearheaded.

Is it time to say goodbye when he no longer enjoys two of his five favorite things? Or three of the five? Or all five? It’s your decision.

“It’s whatever feels right to you and will be most compassionate for your pet,” Nguyen says.

There’s a wrinkle, though. Often, an aging or ill pet doesn’t suddenly lose his ability to enjoy walks or treats. Instead, the changes come little by little. Then it’s time to think about his quality of life. Does he enjoy treats or walks 30% of the time? 50% of the time? Or not at all?

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