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Pet Health: Is the End Near?

Is your dog or cat just getting older or could it be time to face your greatest fear about your pet?
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WebMD Magazine - Feature

When Alex Nocifera's 12-year-old Weimaraner, Bodi, started panting hard during a hiking trip, he became concerned. When the dog later showed no interest in her food or water, he knew something was really wrong.

Still, he didn't see the end coming. "Now that I look back, there were slight indications," Nocifera says of Bodi's last days. "I remember a few months prior to the trip she was just a bit less active," he says. He chalked her slower pace up to aging.

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Often, it is only in retrospect that pet owners recognize early signs of declining health. They can be subtle, says Jules Benson, MRCVS, a veterinarian in Doylestown, Pa. And cats and dogs take a very different approach when it comes to letting us know they're sick, he says.

"Dogs are pack animals. When one member is sick, they don't hide it. Dogs tend to tell us when things are going wrong," says Benson. A dog in pain may become quiet and subdued, or bark or whine more than usual. Sudden loss of appetite is a big signal that something is wrong. So is rapid weight loss.

And it's a mistake, Benson says, to assume a dog that doesn't want to exercise or play any longer is simply slowing with age. Low-grade, ongoing pain frequently goes undiagnosed and can sap Fido of his energy.

The Warning Signs for Cats

The messages cats send when they're sick, however, can be quite nuanced. "Cats go away to die on their own," Benson says. "They won't seek the comfort and attention of others in the house."

A cat that lies down and can't get up as easily as before or hides in the closet or under the bed more often could be telling you something's wrong. Other signs a cat is ill include eating and drinking less than usual (check the litter box for clues), weight loss, or hair that is less shiny or has changed texture.

Perhaps the best way to identify serious illness in your cat or dog is by focusing on wellness and prevention. Regular checkups as your pet matures help establish baseline health measurements, which make it easier to catch and treat illness early if a problem shows up in subsequent tests.

In the end, Nocifera couldn't deny that Bodi's best days were behind her. "She looked sad and horrible," he says. He made the painful, but he believes merciful, decision to euthanize Bodi. "She had gotten so sick," he says. "It was time for her to go."

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