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Are you planning to add a dog to your household and wondering what breed to choose?

Although many breeds are praised as "good with children," there's no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Your neighbors across the street may love their labradoodle, but that doesn't mean you should get the same breed.

Before researching dog breeds, ask yourself a few questions about your family situation, says Susan Nelson, DVM. She's a clinical associate professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University.

Family Checklist

How old are your kids? If you have smaller children, like toddlers and preschoolers, you might think you're better off with a smaller dog. But Nelson says it's just the opposite.

"You want a dog that can take the bumps and not turn around and nip. Bigger dogs can handle the rough play of younger children, while smaller dogs, like Yorkies, can really get hurt if a child falls on them."

Where do you live? If you have a big backyard or nearby open spaces, large or very active dogs that need to roam will do well. In a city apartment, you'll probably want a smaller furry friend.

How active are you and how much time do you have to spend with the dog? Some dogs are great with kids, or anyone, as long as they're given plenty of physical and mental exercise.

"Jack Russells are really high energy and can be a lot of fun for kids, but they aren't right for a family who doesn't have the time to keep them active," Nelson says.

Picking a Breed

Once you've thought about some of these questions, then it's time to research the breeds that match your needs.

Some of the breeds that are good with children include:

Golden retrievers. These dogs rank among the most popular breeds in the U.S. for a reason. They're friendly, intelligent, eager to please, and easy to train.

"They're also particularly kid-hardy, so if you have toddlers who are prone to bumping into them, it's not a problem," Nelson says. "They're almost always very friendly."

Labrador retrievers. Like golden retrievers, these dogs are sweet-natured, trainable, and sturdy.

Labrador retrievers also have one small advantage over golden retrievers: they're short-coated. "That doesn't mean they don't shed, but they don't need as much brushing," Nelson says.

Cavalier King Charles spaniels. If you're looking for a smaller breed, the cheerful cavvy is an excellent family dog.

"They're sturdier than some of the really small breeds like Yorkies, but still small enough to be a lap dog, and generally they are just happy little dogs," Nelson says.

Standard poodles. Smaller poodles can sometimes be yippy and nippy, but the standards -- almost the same size as retrievers -- are more even-keeled.