Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Healthy Dogs

Select An Article
Font Size

The Best Dog Breed for Families and Children

By Sandy Eckstein
WebMD Pet Health Feature

The kids have been begging for a puppy for years. You've been able to put them off with some fish, maybe a hamster, or even a cat. But this time, only something from the canine family will do.

Although many people are happy getting a mixed breed puppy, others like to know a little more about what that cute little ball of fur will look like in a year. If that’s the case, then you need to look at purebred dogs. But how do you find the best one for your family? Gina DiNardo, assistant vice president of the American Kennel Club and second-generation dog fancier, answers the most commonly asked questions about breeds.


Q: What kind of research should I do when trying to decide which breed is best for my family?

A: You should consult your veterinarian and then look on the AKC web site. Look at each breed you’re interested in and determine the exercise requirements, the grooming requirements, the temperament, and the trainability of each breed. Once you’ve narrowed it down to a few breeds, then talk to some experts on those breeds. You can go to a dog show and talk to breeders, or use our web site and call people from the national club.

After you’re sure of the breeds you’re interested in, spend time with each breed, either by going to a dog show or contacting a local breeder. A good breeder will let you interact with their dogs because any dog they place with your family will be with you for life. They want to be sure not only that the dog is right for you but also that your family is right for the dog.


Q: Are some breeds more "kid friendly" than others? Which ones?

A: The highly trainable breeds are great with kids because they’re usually eager to please and are usually more family oriented rather than wanting to attach themselves to one person. Look at the sporting group. These are dogs that were bred to work side by side with humans, taking direction from their owner. They also are some of the most popular family dogs -- your golden retrievers, your Labrador retrievers. Some of the herding breeds, such as German shepherds and collies, also are highly trainable.

Next Article:

Today on WebMD

bulldog in party hat
Breeds with longevity
Doberman Pinscher Clipped Ears
The facts about ear cropping and tail docking.
dog with duck in mouth
Which are considered smartest?
boxer dog
What are their health issues?
Pit bull looking up
Pets: Is My Dog Normal
Dog scratching behind ear
dog catching frisbee
Dog Breed RMQ
Lady owner feeding dog
bulldog in party hat

Special Sections