Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Healthy Dogs

Select An Article
Font Size

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Chocolate

WebMD Pet Health Feature
Reviewed by Amy Flowers, DVM

Your dog begs for handouts, hoping for a stray scrap to savor. But when it comes to sharing your favorite foods with your canine pal, there’s one snack you have to hold back: chocolate.

The sweet treat can lead to illness and even death in dogs. Vets say it’s one of the most common causes of dogpoisoning.

Dog Care


Surprising Ways to Exercise With Your Dog

Here are some fun ideas to help your pooch lose his pooch.

If you think your pooch might've eaten chocolate -- especially the darker kinds -- call your vet right away. She'll ask about your dog’s size, what kind of chocolate he ate, and how much. She might want you to make your dog vomit or simply watch his behavior, says vet Tina Wismer, DVM. She's the medical director of the Animal Poison Control Center at the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).

A chocolate chip cookie can cause problems for a little dog, and a bag of chocolate chips can spell trouble for a big one.

Your Dog Ate Chocolate. Now What?

Typically, your dog will vomit on his own. If not, your vet might want you to give him hydrogen peroxide to make him throw up -- 1 tablespoon for every 20 pounds, Wismer says. You can use a turkey baster or a medicine dropper to give him the liquid.

Some pet owners bribe their dog with peanut butter in a bowl and the hydrogen peroxide around the rim, she says, seeing as pups tend to lick their bowls clean. Once your dog vomits, don’t give him any food or water.

If you think your dog ate chocolate, don't wait for warning signs, Wismer says. These can take 6 to 12 hours to show up. Symptoms include:

The stimulants in chocolate stay in the body a long time. In severe cases, symptoms can last up to 72 hours. Early treatment will help your dog recover quicker and lower your costs, Wismer says.

Vets judge a dog’s condition and then decide on the right treatment, says Joseph Kinnarney, DVM. He's the president-elect of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Next Article:

Today on WebMD

bulldog in party hat
Breeds with longevity
Doberman Pinscher Clipped Ears
The facts about ear cropping and tail docking.
dog with duck in mouth
Which are considered smartest?
boxer dog
What are their health issues?
Pit bull looking up
Pets: Is My Dog Normal
Dog scratching behind ear
dog catching frisbee
Dog Breed RMQ
Lady owner feeding dog
bulldog in party hat

Special Sections