Skip to content

Healthy Dogs

Select An Article
Font Size

Dog Vitamins and Supplements: Get the Facts

WebMD teams up with veterinarians to talk about vitamin safety, dangers, and what to look for.
By
WebMD Pet Health Feature

Many people take dietary supplements or vitamins. And increasingly, they’re likely to give them to their pets, too.

As many as a third of U.S. dogs and cats may receive vitamins or supplements. The most common are multivitamins, supplements to support arthritic joints, and fatty acids to reduce shedding and improve a coat’s shine, according to a 2006 study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Pet owners also may give probiotics to alleviate gastrointestinal problems or antioxidants to counteract the effects of aging, such as cognitive dysfunction.

With a growing population of aging, overweight dogs, the market for dog supplements is expected to increase 37% by 2012, reaching $1.7 billion, according to Packaged Facts, a market research firm.

Veterinary nutritionist Susan Wynn, DVM, sees many clients in her practice near Atlanta who give their dogs vitamins and nutritional supplements. “They come in with bags full sometimes,” she says.

But do dogs need those vitamins and supplements? And are they even safe? Experts say some work, others don’t, and some aren’t necessary and may even be harmful to dogs.

“Most people are doing it because they want to, not because it’s necessary,” says C.A. Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, professor of veterinary clinical sciences at The Ohio State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

WebMD talked with experts for answers to frequently asked questions about dog vitamins and supplements.

1. Does my dog need vitamins?

Most dogs receive a complete and balanced diet - including necessary vitamins and minerals - from commercially processed dog food, according to the FDA. Dogs fed a homemade diet may need supplements. “It’s absolutely critical, but it should be done to match the diet,” Wynn says. “You can’t just create a meal and give your dog a vitamin.” Check with a veterinarian or nutritionist for help in determining what, if anything, is needed.

2. Is there any danger in giving my dog vitamins?

Possibly. If an animal already eats a balanced diet and receives excess portions of some vitamins and minerals, they could be harmful, according to the FDA and veterinarians.

Too much calcium can cause skeletal problems, especially in large-breed puppies; too much vitamin A can harm blood vessels and cause dehydration and joint pain. Excess vitamin D can prompt a dog to stop eating, harm bones, and cause muscles to atrophy.

Next Article:

Today on WebMD

bulldog in party hat
Breeds with longevity
Doberman Pinscher Clipped Ears
The facts about ear cropping and tail docking.
 
dog with duck in mouth
Which are considered smartest?
boxer dog
What are their health issues?
 
Pit bull looking up
Article
Pets: Is My Dog Normal
Slideshow
 
Dog scratching behind ear
Slideshow
dog catching frisbee
Slideshow
 

Love your pets, hate your allergies?

Get tips for relief.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Dog Breed RMQ
Quiz
Lady owner feeding dog
Slideshow
 
pooldle
Slideshow
bulldog in party hat
Slideshow