Skip to content

    Healthy Dogs

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Dog DNA Tests: Why Your Mutt’s Makeup Matters

    Discovering your mutt’s background is easier and less expensive than you think.

    Testing the DNA Tests continued...

    Here are the DNA tests Belzer used and their cost at the time he did the tests:

    Wisdom Panel (301-444-7900)

    • Cost: $79.99
    • Tests dog’s DNA against 170 different breeds
    • Findings: Made up of at least 50% Siberian Husky and 25% Border Collie

    Canine Heritage Breed Test (800-362-3644)

    • Cost: $99.95
    • Tests dog’s DNA against 105 different breeds
    • Findings: Siberian Husky as a secondary breed (Canine Heritage only lists a primary breed if the dog has a purebred parent), with German Shepherd in the mix

    DDC Veterinary (800-625-0874)

    • Cost: $68
    • Tests dog’s DNA against 62 different breeds
    • Findings: Level 1 Siberian Husky, made up of at least 75%, level 4 German Shepherd, made up of between 10% and 19%

    “It was pretty easy,” says Belzer of the collection process. After he sent the completed test kits back to each company, results came within two to four weeks (Wisdom Panel was the quickest; both of the others took about a month). DDC and Canine Heritage findings came in the mail, and Wisdom Panel’s results were emailed.

    Two of the three companies’ results validated Belzer’s hypothesis: that Girl was a Siberian Husky/German Shepherd mix. Wisdom Panel, which tests against more breeds than the other two, suggested Girl was part Border Collie. “That was something I would have never considered,” says Belzer, who doesn’t question the accuracy of the test. “The results were a little out of line with what the other two found, but it’s certainly not a breed that I would rule out.”

    All of the companies contain disclaimers that the test is for informational purposes only, and most owners order dog DNA tests solely for the curiosity factor. “It answers hypothetical questions and can validate your assumptions,” Belzer says. “It’s also a great conversation piece at the dog park.”

    Why Test Your Dog’s DNA?

    Once predominant breeds are established, owners can take their results to their veterinarian to discuss potential health issues associated with specific breeds. “Boxers are prone to getting cancer, and Dobermans sometimes have bleeding disorders similar to hemophiliacs,” says Bernadine Cruz, DVM, associate veterinarian at California’s Laguna Hills Animal Hospital. Knowing these potential risks ahead of time, and asking your veterinarian to keep an eye out for them, can save lives.

    Today on WebMD

    bulldog in party hat
    Breeds with longevity
    Doberman Pinscher Clipped Ears
    The facts about ear cropping and tail docking.
     
    dog with duck in mouth
    Which are considered smartest?
    boxer dog
    What are their health issues?
     
    Pit bull looking up
    Article
    Pets: Is My Dog Normal
    Slideshow
     
    Dog scratching behind ear
    Slideshow
    dog catching frisbee
    Slideshow
     
    Dog Breed RMQ
    Quiz
    Lady owner feeding dog
    Slideshow
     
    pooldle
    Slideshow
    bulldog in party hat
    Slideshow