Skip to content

Healthy Dogs

Font Size

Uveitis (Soft Eye) in Dogs

This disease is caused by an inflammation of the iris and ciliary body. The iris is the shutter that controls the size of the pupil. The ciliary body produces the fluid that nourishes the structures in front of the lens and maintains intraocular pressure.

Most cases of anterior uveitis are caused by autoimmune complexes that gain access to the anterior chamber. Thus, anterior uveitis may occur with a long list of bacterial infections and systemic diseases in dogs. Local diseases associated with anterior uveitis include corneal ulceration, rupture of the lens, and trauma to the eye. In some cases of uveitis the cause is unknown.

Recommended Related to Dogs

Kidney Problems in Dogs

Just like human kidneys, your dog’s kidneys balance certain substances in the blood and filter out the body's wastes as urine. They maintain normal concentrations of salt and water in the body. Kidneys also help control blood pressure, aid in calcium metabolism and sustain phosphorous levels. Additionally, they manufacture a hormone that encourages red-blood cell production. When kidneys don't function properly, toxins build up in the blood and a dog will become ill.

Read the Kidney Problems in Dogs article > >

Anterior uveitis is painful and is accompanied by a red eye, severe tearing and squinting, avoidance of light, and protrusion of the third eyelid. The pupil is small and reacts sluggishly to light. It may appear hazy or cloudy due to inflammation in the anterior chamber. A distinguishing feature of anterior uveitis (but one that is not always present) is that the affected eye feels softer than the normal eye.

The diagnosis is made by a complete veterinary eye examination. It is important to measure intraocular pressure to rule out glaucoma.

Treatment: Any systemic or local disease must be identified and treated. The treatment of uveitis is complex and involves the use of local and systemic corticosteroids, NSAIDs, immunosuppressants, and drugs that dilate the pupil. Problems that can occur along with or after an episode of anterior uveitis include secondary glaucoma, cataracts, sunken eye, and blindness. The likelihood of such complications can be minimized by early diagnosis and treatment.

WebMD Veterinary Reference from "Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook"

Today on WebMD

bulldog in party hat
Breeds with longevity
Doberman Pinscher Clipped Ears
The facts about ear cropping and tail docking.
 
dog with duck in mouth
Which are considered smartest?
boxer dog
What are their health issues?
 
Pit bull looking up
Article
Pets: Is My Dog Normal
Slideshow
 
Dog scratching behind ear
Slideshow
dog catching frisbee
Slideshow
 

Love your pets, hate your allergies?

Get tips for relief.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Dog Breed RMQ
Quiz
Lady owner feeding dog
Slideshow
 
pooldle
Slideshow
bulldog in party hat
Slideshow