Why Is My Dog Falling Down?

Little kids love spinning in place until they fall down. But when we're talking about our dogs, there's really no good reason for loss of balance.

So why do dogs fall down? Is it possible to treat loss of balance? And when should your canine companion see a vet?

When to See a Vet

Injury, stroke, poisoning, and infections can all cause your dog to lose its balance. Because these things can be dangerous or even life threatening, call your vet immediately if your dog is falling down.

Dog Loss of Balance: Common Causes and Treatments

A few of the more common causes of falling down in dogs include:

Vestibular Syndrome. Vestibular syndrome is caused by dysfunction of the inner ear. Because the symptoms occur suddenly, they are sometimes confused with symptoms of stroke. Along with loss of balance and falling over, signs may include head tilt, walking in circles, vomiting, nausea, and flicking of the eyes from side to side.

Treating vestibular syndrome depends on the cause. Many dogs need support for secondary symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and dehydration.

Ear Infection. Inner ear infections are a common cause of dogs losing their balance. Other symptoms include head shaking and scratching, eye flicking, walking in circles. Often there may be redness, swelling, discharge, and odor associated with the affected ear.

Left untreated, infections of the external parts of the ear can move deeper, become more serious, and lead to complications like inner ear infection or meningitis. So always have your dog seen by a veterinarian if you suspect an ear infection. Treating ear infections may include a professional cleaning, topical medications, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and possibly surgery for chronic or serious infections.

Injury. Injuries such as head trauma or damage to the inner ear can cause dogs to lose their balance. Your dog can't tell you when it's in pain, and dogs sometimes mask hurt with behaviors such as wagging their tail. So it's important to be aware of canine signs of pain. They include slower reflexes, heavy panting, biting or licking the wounded area, anxiety, enlarged pupils, reluctance to lie down, and change in appetite.

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Stroke. Strokes in dogs are fairly uncommon. But they do happen. A stroke can be caused by many things, including blood clots, hemorrhage, head trauma, high blood pressure, kidney disease, and even migrating worms. Symptoms of stroke in dogs include loss of balance, head tilt, circling, falling down, and loss of vision.

Treating stroke involves managing the underlying problem and preventing additional strokes. It also includes caring for the aftereffects of a stroke.

Tumors. Brain tumors are not uncommon in older dogs. They can also happen in younger dogs, especially boxers and Boston terriers. Brain tumors can lead to a loss of balance, as well as a host of other symptoms.

The exact symptoms depend on the tumor and its location. They may include seizures, behavior changes, changes in appetite or thirst, signs of pain, head tilt, swaying, a wide stance, lack of coordination, head tremors, flicking of the eye, and pacing. Treating brain tumors may involve chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and other care.

Other Reasons for Loss of Balance in Dogs

Any process which causes inflammation of the brain -- referred to as encephalitis -- may cause a dog to lose its balance. Encephalitis can result from tick-borne diseases, fungal infections, protozoal infections, and many other causes. Other signs include fever and depression.

Your vet can help you and your pet share a long and happy life together. If you have any questions about your dog's health, be sure to talk to your veterinarian about your concerns.

WebMD Veterinary Reference Reviewed by Amy Flowers, DVM on 3/, 015

Sources

SOURCES:

Fogle, B. Caring for Your Dog, Dorling Kindersley, Ltd., 2002.

Fogle, B. ASPCA Complete Dog Care Manual, DK Publishing, 1993.

North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine: "Neurology."

Bairbre O'Malley Veterinary Hospital: "Healthcare for the Senior Dog."

Prospect Veterinary Centre: "Stroke."

University of Minnesota, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory: "EIC Information."

University of Florida, Neurology Service: "Vestibular Disease in Animals."

Orchard Veterinary Group Glastonbury: "First Aid in Pets II."

Veterinary Partner: "Ear Infections," and "Poison-Proof Your Pet."

Cornell University, Department of Animal Science: "Poisonous Plants Affecting Dogs."

Kahn, C. The Merck/Merial Manual for Pet Health, Home Edition, Merck & Co., Inc., 2007.

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