Skip to content

Healthy Dogs

Artificial Respiration and CPR for Dogs

Font Size
A
A
A

CPR

CRP is a combination of artificial respiration and heart massage. If a dog needs heart massage, he also needs artificial respiration. On the other hand, if the dog resists your attempts to perform CPR, he probably does not need it!

For puppies and small dogs under 30 pounds (13.6 kg)

  1. Place the dog on a flat surface, right side down.
  2. Place your cupped hands on either side of the rib cage over the heart, immediately behind the point of the elbow. (For puppies, use your thumb on one side of the chest and the rest of your fingers on the other.)
  3. Compress the chest 1 inch to 11⁄2 inches (2.5 to 4 cm-that should be one-quarter to one-third the width of the chest). Squeeze for a count of 1, then release for a count of 1. Continue at a rate of 100 compressions per minute.
  4. With one-person CPR, administer a breath after every five compressions. With two-person CPR, administer a breath after every two to three compressions.

For medium and large dogs

  1. Place the dog on a flat surface, right side down. Position yourself behind the dog’s back.
  2. Place the heel of one hand over the widest portion of the rib cage, not over the heart. Place the heel of your other hand on top of the first.
  3. Keep both elbows straight and push down firmly on the rib cage. Compress the chest one-quarter to one-third of its width. Compress for a count of 1, then release for a count of 1. Continue at a rate of 80 compressions per minute.
  4. With one-person CPR, administer a breath after every five compressions. With two-person CPR, administer a breath after every two to three compressions.

Continue CPR until the dog breathes on his own and has a steady pulse. If vital signs do not return after 10 minutes of CPR, the likelihood of success is remote. Consider stopping CPR.

Note that CPR has the potential to cause complications, including broken ribs and pneumothorax. Also, never practice artificial respiration or heart massage on a healthy dog; you can seriously injure the dog.

WebMD Veterinary Reference from "Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook"

1 | 2

Today on WebMD

bulldog in party hat
Breeds with longevity
Doberman Pinscher Clipped Ears
The facts about ear cropping and tail docking.
 
dog with duck in mouth
Which are considered smartest?
boxer dog
What are their health issues?
 
Pit bull looking up
Article
Pets: Is My Dog Normal
Slideshow
 
Dog scratching behind ear
Slideshow
dog catching frisbee
Slideshow
 

Love your pets, hate your allergies?

Get tips for relief.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Dog Breed RMQ
Quiz
Lady owner feeding dog
Slideshow
 
pooldle
Slideshow
bulldog in party hat
Slideshow