Skip to content

    Healthy Pets

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Why Is My Dog Falling Down?

    Little kids love spinning in place until they fall down. But when we're talking about our dogs, there's really no good reason for loss of balance.

    So why do dogs fall down? Is it possible to treat loss of balance? And when should your canine companion see a vet?

    Recommended Related to Pets

    Nail Clipping and Nail Care for Cats

    Does your kitty disappear when the clippers come out? Do you have to wrap her in a towel to give her a manicure? According to our behavior experts, calm, enjoyable nail-trimming sessions are not only possible-that’s how they should always be! Check out the following tips for getting kitty to relax while you trim, turning nail-clipping sessions into enjoyable together time.

    Read the Nail Clipping and Nail Care for Cats article > >

    When to See a Vet

    Injury, stroke, poisoning, and infections can all cause your dog to lose its balance. Because these things can be dangerous or even life threatening, call your vet immediately if your dog is falling down.

    Dog Loss of Balance: Common Causes and Treatments

    A few of the more common causes of falling down in dogs include:

    Vestibular Syndrome. Vestibular syndrome is caused by dysfunction of the inner ear. Because the symptoms occur suddenly, they are sometimes confused with symptoms of stroke. Along with loss of balance and falling over, signs may include head tilt, walking in circles, vomiting, nausea, and flicking of the eyes from side to side.

    Treating vestibular syndrome depends on the cause. Many dogs need support for secondary symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and dehydration.

    Ear Infection. Inner ear infections are a common cause of dogs losing their balance. Other symptoms include head shaking and scratching, eye flicking, walking in circles. Often there may be redness, swelling, discharge, and odor associated with the affected ear.

    Left untreated, infections of the external parts of the ear can move deeper, become more serious, and lead to complications like inner ear infection or meningitis. So always have your dog seen by a veterinarian if you suspect an ear infection. Treating ear infections may include a professional cleaning, topical medications, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and possibly surgery for chronic or serious infections.

    Injury. Injuries such as head trauma or damage to the inner ear can cause dogs to lose their balance. Your dog can't tell you when it's in pain, and dogs sometimes mask hurt with behaviors such as wagging their tail. So it's important to be aware of canine signs of pain. They include slower reflexes, heavy panting, biting or licking the wounded area, anxiety, enlarged pupils, reluctance to lie down, and change in appetite.

    Today on WebMD

    Puppy digging hole
    Are you putting your pet at risk?
    Cat looking at fish
    Things we can learn from our pets.
     
    dog and kitten
    27 ways pets help your health.
    tick
    Get the facts about prevention.
     
    Woman holding puppy
    Article
    Sad dog and guacamole
    Slideshow
     
    Siamese cat eating from bowl
    Slideshow
    cat on couch
    Evaluator
     
    Cat People vs Dog People Slideshow
    Slideshow
    Kitten playing
    Quiz
     
    Orange cat nuzzling woman
    Slideshow
    German shephard reading a book
    Quiz