Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Font Size

Does Your Cat Need a New Home?

Try these solutions to 6 common problems before you make that decision.

6 Reasons Your Cat Doesn’t Need a New Home

Here are solid solutions to problems that you may not have thought were fixable.

Inter-cat aggression. Do you like every new person you meet? Neither does your cat! Bring a new cat into a household with established felines and everyone usually becomes purring pals -- but sometimes things don’t go so smoothly and fights break out. Cats instinctually have a social order where one cat is dominant, so some degree of fighting is normal when first introducing a new cat. This usually resolves quickly once the new order is established. Cats can also become aggressive for reasons such as illness.

To help you get a handle on cat aggression:

Talk with your vet first. If one of your cats has recently become aggressive, the cause could be a serious illness. Get your cat examined by the vet before taking any other action.

Let cats get acquainted slowly. When introducing established cats to a new cat or kitten, don’t hurry. Let them meet by smell and sound first. After a week, they can be visually introduced, and after that, let them spend time together. And introduce the newbie to each established cat individually.

Reduce resource competition. Litter boxes, food bowls, water, kitty perches -- cats will fight over all of these if there aren’t enough to go around. Reduce kitty traffic jams at these hot spots by having several food and water bowls in different locations, multiple perches, and at least two litter boxes -- or one for each cat, if you can manage it.

Consult a behavior specialist. If illness and resources aren’t the issue, it’s time to call a veterinary behaviorist or CAAB, who can help you get to the behavioral root of your cat’s aggression.

Don’t punish an aggressive cat. Don’t fight aggression with aggression; the result is often more aggression -- and fear. To stop a cat fight, squirt the cats with water, clap your hands or make another loud noise, or throw something soft, like a wadded up sock, at them. Never try to pull fighting cats apart.

Next Article:

What is the biggest challenge you face in keeping your cat?