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Treating and Preventing Fleas on Cats

(continued)

New Methods of Flea Control continued...

Advantage (imidacloprid) is a once-a-month topical liquid that kills fleas by direct contact.

Following application, 98 to 100 percent of adult fleas are killed within 12 hours. Thus, any new fleas that infest the cat should be killed before they have a chance to lay eggs. This breaks the flea life cycle and eventually eliminates fleas in the environment. Advantage is not absorbed into the cat’s system, and therefore is nontoxic. Humans do not absorb the chemical after petting a treated cat. Advantage can be used on kittens 8 weeks and up.

Frontline and Frontline Spray contain the active ingredient fipronil, which kills fleas on contact within 24 to 48 hours. The fleas do not need to bite the cat to be killed. Frontline is a topical liquid that comes in tubes and is applied as described for Advantage.

Frontline Plus has S-methoprene, which is labeled to kill adult fleas, flea eggs, and larvae. It also treats chewing lice and is used as part of a program to control sarcoptic mange. Frontline Plus is labeled for kittens 8 weeks of age and up.

Revolution (selamectin), a heartworm preventive, is a once-a-month topical liquid that is applied to the skin of the cat’s neck between the shoulder blades, as described for Advantage. It also controls adult fleas and prevents flea eggs from hatching. Selamectin can also be used to control ear mites, roundworms, and hookworms, as well as some ticks.

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WebMD Veterinary Reference from "Cat Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook"

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