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Healthy Cats

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Cat Grooming

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If your cat’s coat becomes greasy and oily, or if she’s gotten into something sticky or smelly, she’ll benefit from a bath. Use a mild shampoo that’s safe to use on cats, and follow these easy steps:

  • First, give your pet a good brushing to remove all dead hair and mats.
  • Place a rubber bath mat in a sink or tub to provide secure footing.
  • Put your cat in a tub or sink that has been filled with about 3 to 4 inches of lukewarm water.
  • Use a spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes or nose. If you don’t have a spray hose, a large plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup will do.
  • Gently massage in shampoo, working from head to tail.
  • Thoroughly rinse with a spray hose or pitcher; again, avoid the ears, eyes and nose
  • Dry your pet with a large towel.

Nail Clipping

Most people really don’t handle their cats’ feet until they are about to clip the nails and out! Some animals can get very upset at this totally foreign feeling. That’s why it’s a good idea to get your cat used to having her feet touched before you attempt a nail trim. Rub your hand up and down her leg and then gently press each individual toe-and be sure to give her lots of praise and some food treats as you do this. Every animal is different, but chances are that within a week or two of daily foot massage, your cat will accept nail clipping without too much fuss. Here’s how to do it:

  • Begin by applying gentle pressure to the top of the foot and cushiony pad underneath-this will cause her to extend her claws.
  • Use sharp, high-quality cat nail scissors to cut off the white tip of each nail, just before the point where it begins to curl.
  • Take care to avoid the quick, a vein that runs into the nail. This pink area can be seen through the nail.
  • If you do accidentally cut into this pink area, it may bleed, in which case you can apply some styptic powder to stop the bleeding.
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