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Healthy Cats

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Cat Grooming

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ASPCA logoYour feline will look (and feel!) like the cat’s meow after a good grooming session.

By nature, cats are extremely fastidious. You’ve no doubt watched your kitty washing herself several times a day. For the most part she can take care of herself very well, thank you, but sometimes she’ll need a little help from you.

Make Grooming as Enjoyable as Possible -- For the Both of You

Grooming sessions should be fun for the both of you, so be sure to schedule them when your cat’s relaxed, perhaps after exercise or eating. You want your pet to remember grooming sessions in a positive way, so you never want to risk losing your temper. If you’ve had a stressful day or are in a bad mood, it’s probably not a good time to groom your cat.

Keep your first grooming sessions short-just 5 to 10 minutes. Gradually lengthen the time until your pet is used to the routine. You should also get your pet used to being handled. Get in the habit of petting every single part of your cat-including ears, tail, belly and back-and especially the feet!

And keep in mind, a little patience can go a long way. If your cat is extremely stressed out, cut the session short and try again when she’s calmer. Unfortunately, most cats do not like baths, so you may need another person to help. And remember to pile on the praise and offer her a treat when the session is over.


Regular sessions with a brush or comb will help keep your pet’s hair in good condition by removing dirt, spreading natural oils throughout her coat, preventing tangles and keeping her skin clean and irritant-free.

If your cat has short hair, you only need to brush once a week:

  • First, use a metal comb and work through her fur from head to tail.
  • Next, use a bristle or rubber brush to remove dead and loose hair.
  • Be extra-gentle near her chest and belly.

If your cat has long hair, you will need to brush every day:

  • Start by combing her belly and legs; be sure to untangle any knots.
  • Next, brush her fur in an upward motion with a bristle or rubber brush.
  • To brush her tail, make a part down the middle and brush the fur out on either side.

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