Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Healthy Cats

Font Size

Adding Another Cat to Your Home

Expert help to ensure all of your cats get along.
By Carol Bryant
WebMD Pet Health Feature

You’ve decided it’s time to add a new cat to your life. But what about the cat or cats you already have?

Whether a spunky kitten or a frisky adult cat is moving in, here's advice to help minimize the hissing and scratching during the transition and to help your new and present cat(s) become BFFs -- best feline friends.

Recommended Related to Cats

Cats and Scratching: Practical Tips for Owners

Cats like to scratch. They scratch during play. They scratch while stretching. They scratch to mark territory or as a threatening signal other cats. And because cats’ claws need regular sharpening, cats scratch on things to remove frayed, worn outer claws and expose new, sharper claws. Unfortunately, all this scratching can cause a lot of damage to furniture, drapes and carpeting!

Read the Cats and Scratching: Practical Tips for Owners article > >

Make Sure You’re All Ready

Before you get another cat, think about the personality of the cat or cats you already have. Diana L. Guerrero author of Resources for Crisis Management for Animal Care Facilities, says the decision to add a new cat should be based on your present cat's personality and its predisposition toward other animals.

Next, consider whether you are ready to be excluded (temporarily) from the pack.

Christine Pellicano, owner and operator of Aunt Christine's Little Dog House in New York, says, “Always be prepared to lose a bond with a cat that has been an only cat when you introduce a new one. The cats tend to seek each other out to your exclusion for a while -- sometimes an entire year. You can feel left out."

Prepare Your Home and Cats

Preparing your home and your other cats will take time, consistency, and patience. “Prep the home by selecting an area for a neutral zone," Guerrero says. "If you have a screened-in porch, this can be an ideal location because the cats can view and smell each other without the chance of an altercation.”

Steps to take include:

  • Provide room to retreat. Have cat trees and shelves on multiple levels as areas of escape and retreat for safety.
  • Add another litter box. This stops litter box avoidance and marking tendencies that may occur with the addition of a new cat.
  • Get scratching posts. At first, your cats may claw more. So have scratching posts available.

First Impressions

"Give the new kitty a towel or toy that belongs to your current cat. It should have your cat’s scent on it," says Michele Hollow of South Orange, N.J., author of The Everything Guide to Working with Animals.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

cat at table
What's safe for them to eat?
Maine Coon cat breed
What they do and why cats have them.
Kitten in litterbox
How to solve them.
cat meowing
Why some cats are so talkative
cat on couch
Kitten using litter box
sleeping kitten
sad kitten looking at milk glass
cat at table
muddy dog on white sofa
Maine Coon cat breed
Pets: Behavior Problems in Cats